Urban air pollution and its effect on fog occurrence: a view from Northern India

Dense fog in Delhi (Source: Hindustan Times)

Dense fog in Delhi (Source: Hindustan Times)

Many Asian countries, including China and India, are facing a major problem of urban air pollution. This is alarming because most of the population of these countries are now living in urban cities. Furthermore many inhabitants of rural areas are aiming to relocate to urban cities for better life opportunities. The rising populations in megacities are a major driver in creating air pollution. Over the last few years, the increasing levels of air pollutant concentrations, mainly as secondary aerosol, in the south Asian urban atmosphere is making a serious impact on Continue reading

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Posted in Climate

ClimateSnack Norwich blossoms

The UEA ClimateSnack hanging out on campus

The UEA ClimateSnack hanging out on campus

After the set up of a small pilot group and a very productive advertising campaign, the University of East Anglia in Norwich (United Kingdom) officially has a ClimateSnack writing group! Admittedly, it all started on a bit of a misunderstanding: a vague “hum yeah, I’ll write one day when I have time” on Twitter, followed by a brief exchange of rushed words during a summer school. It soon blossomed into “There is now a writing group at UEA!” thanks to the energy and support of five motivated PhD students. Continue reading

Posted in News

The dispatchers of knowledge

XKCD #397 "Unscientific".

What is scientific? XKCD #397 “Unscientific”, licensed under CC BY-NC 2.5.

Journal editors have a key role in the scientific process. By having the final decision on which papers appear in their journal, they act as gatekeepers to ensure that all contributions meet minimum requirements regarding innovation and cogency. Their decisions also shape the scientific discussion and indirectly the collective consciousness of the community. As this consciousness defines what is perceived as valuable and timely research, the editor’s decisions will eventually impact Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Communication, Scicomm | Tagged , , , , ,

Where is the World Environment Organization?

 

A suggested World Environment Organization logo (original image credit: cleanbiz.asia)

A suggested World Environment Organization logo (original image credit: cleanbiz.asia)

While reading reports from various international organisations in the early stages of my research, I found it hard to believe how the environment is not given the same status as other global issues. It is an anomaly of the United Nations that there is no dedicated environmental organisation amongst the 15 autonomous, specialised agencies. This secondary status and the lack of coherence Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Future, KlimaSnakk | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Forecasting the present

Location of weather stations in the vicinity of Birmingham.

Location of weather stations in the vicinity of Birmingham. The overlay grid has a spacing of 1.5km. Only the three green dots are Met Office stations; the red and blue marks represent amateur observations, which are not used for Met Office forecasts. The source of the image, [1], contains much more discussion on both the advantages of and the problems with amateur observations.

Forecasting the weather is very difficult, but the concept itself is simple. If we know the state of the atmosphere right now, the initial state, we can use well-understood physical laws to predict how the atmosphere will change over time. But how do we know what the atmosphere is doing right now?

At first, the answer might seem obvious: weather monitoring stations all over the country take measurements throughout the day. Surely these tell us what the atmosphere is doing at the moment? Unfortunately, these observations alone do not give us enough information to make a good forecast.

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Room with unexpected view: when coastal erosion strikes

Normandy’s white cliff and the needle of Etretat (photo by C. Heuzé)

Normandy’s white cliff and the needle of Etretat (photo by C. Heuzé)

Coastal erosion by wind and rain is a phenomenon which occurred even before humans were around to spot it. Yet with the urbanisation of the coastlines and the increased frequency of storms and cold events these last years, it feels like the problem is getting serious. Focusing mainly on my hometown Dieppe and its chalk cliff, I’ll talk about the causes, consequences and evolution of coastal erosion.

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Posted in Climate, Present, Regional | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Discussing science writing and communication

OSM_townhall_smallDuring the Ocean Sciences Meeting in Honolulu late last month, ClimateSnack and Resclim held a town hall event to discuss scientific writing and communication skills.

The event was very well attended, with approximately 200-250 people. Continue reading

Posted in Communication, Conference, Learning, Scicomm, Writing skills | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dallas Murphy: Science story-teller

Dallas Murphy's new book To The Denmark Strait, in collaboration with videographer Ben Harden.

Dallas Murphy’s new book To The Denmark Strait, in collaboration with videographer Ben Harden.

I find myself often shying away from conversations about my research for the fear that I am going to bore people to death. I’m starting to realize that it might not be my science that will bore people. Maybe the problem is how I tell my science story.

Sometimes it’s hard for us scientists to see the wood through the trees, or see the story through our science. Indeed, we (should) love our research. However, if our work becomes routine and dare I say it, tedious, Continue reading

Posted in Communication, Scicomm, Sea | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment